Y e l l o w F i n c h Y e l l o w F i n c h

Strangers. Ghost. Faith. Milena Shakujo
(https://soundcloud.com/milenashakujofm)

It will not be long before the drawings of kindergarten children are banned, replaced with digital calligraphic exercises.

Paul Virilio - Art and Fear, translated by Julie Rose, pg. 55

10 - Capitalist Representation

Memory has become a bad thing. Above all, there is no longer any need of belief, and the capitalist is merely striking a pose when he bemoans the fact that nowadays no one believes in anything any more. Language no longer signifies something that must be believed, it indicates rather what is going to be done, something that the shrewd or the competent are able to decode, to half understand. Moreover, despite the abundance of identity cards, files, and other means of control, capitalism does not even need to write in books to make up for the vanished body markings. Those are only relics, archaisms with a current function. The person has become “private” in reality, insofar as he derives from abstract quantities and becomes concrete in the becoming-concrete of these same quantities. It is these quantities that are marked, no longer the persons themselves: your capital or your labor capacity, the rest is not important, we’ll always find a place for you within the expanded limits of the system, even if an axiom has to be created just for you. There is no longer any need of a collective investment of organs, as they are sufficiently filled with the floating images constantly produced by capitalism. To pursue a remark of Henri Lefebrve’s, these images do not initiate a making public of the private so much as a privatization of the public: the whole world unfolds right at home, without one’s having to leave the TV screen. This gives private persons a very special role in the system: a role of application, and no longer of implication, in a code. The hour of Oedipus draws nigh.

Chapter 3, Section 10. Anti-Oedipus: Capitalism & Schizophrenia by Felix Guattari & Gilles Deleuze, pg. 250 - 251.

Or else we make a scarecrow of the day,
Loose ends and jumble of our common world

—W.H. Auden

"The everyday was the vague constellation of spaces and times outside what was organized and institutionalized around work, conformity, and consumerism. It was all the daily habits that were beneath notice, where one remained anonymous. Because it evaded capture and could not be made useful, it was seen by some to have a core of revolutionary potential. For Maurice Blanchot, its dangerous essence was that it was without event, and was both unconcealed and unperceived. In French, the adjective ‘quotidienne’ evokes more strikingly the ancient practice of marking and numbering the passing of the solar day, and it emphasizes the diurnal rhythms that were long a foundation of social existence. But what [other philosophers] also described in the 1950s was the intensifying occupation of everyday life by consumption, organized leisure, and spectacle. In this framework, the rebellions of the late 1960s were, at least in Europe and North America, waged in part around the idea of reclaiming the terrain of everyday life from institutionalization and specialization."

from a review of 24/7: Late Capitalism and the End Of Sleep by Jonathan Crary http://chicagoexpat.blogspot.com/2013/06/a-zone-of-insensibility-jonathan-crarys.html

my country
it seems
is always at
war.
whether it’s stomping the shit
out of helpless 3rd world
nations
or brutalizing its own citizens
here at home
it’s clear this country
is out of control.
a vicious gang
of rich thugs
have constructed
a mechanized military monster,
killed off the buffalo,
paved the continent
from end to end
and declared war.
the war on terror
the war on drugs
the war on crime
the war of the rich against the poor
war war war
the human beast
is loose in the streets
screaming for more.
i am afraid
it will go on and on
war without end
until
unfortunately
everyone is dead.

forever war, from “Stone Hotel: poems from prison" by Raegan Butcher, page 88.

He talks about how his brothers are caring and opinionated, and imagines a world where disabilities were more understood. “By and large, the social order is still at the level of an elementary school playground, and the bullying pushes them out of the social fabric and creates an intense frustration—which actually could be a largely avoidable symptom of their condition, and not the condition itself,” he thinks out loud. “Who knows what they would be like if they weren’t brutalized by society? It’s hard to see how much of our social fabric is made up of a radical refusal to love people.” 
http://pitchfork.com/features/cover-story/9439-how-to-dress-well-soul-to-keep/

He talks about how his brothers are caring and opinionated, and imagines a world where disabilities were more understood. “By and large, the social order is still at the level of an elementary school playground, and the bullying pushes them out of the social fabric and creates an intense frustration—which actually could be a largely avoidable symptom of their condition, and not the condition itself,” he thinks out loud. “Who knows what they would be like if they weren’t brutalized by society? It’s hard to see how much of our social fabric is made up of a radical refusal to love people.”

http://pitchfork.com/features/cover-story/9439-how-to-dress-well-soul-to-keep/

Uncertainty, Despair & Positive Disintegration

JM: I find a lot of what I am drawn to in the teaching I do, the experiential work, is to help people make friends with uncertainty, and reframe it as a way of coming alive. Because there are never any guarantees at any point in life. Perhaps it’s more engrained in the American citizen that we feel we ought to know, we ought to be certain, we ought to be in control, we ought to be upbeat, we ought to be smiling, we ought to be sociable. That cultural cast has tremendous power to keep us benumbed and becalmed. So it’s been central to my life and my work to make friends with our despair, to make friends with our pain for the world.  And thereby to dignify it and honour it. That is very freeing for people.

EB: I suppose it is to embrace the shadow as well.

JM: Yes, and it’s a big shadow.  I find certain science fiction, the imagination, very helpful here. I like to be stretched. Olaf Stapledon wrote in the 1930s, before the nuclear age, with an incredible imagination that was also profoundly spiritual. In The Star Maker, the human mind of Earth in the head of a particular man starts to voyage through space/time and sees the drama that we are involved in here, recognizing our mutual belonging before we kill each other. He sees this basic drama in many different forms, and it’s so rich. Of course, there are planets where consciousness came that just failed. But the adventure as a whole is so big. 

Living systems theory has been so helpful to me. I think there is a drive within living systems to complexify, to wake up—there is an evolutionary movement.  I speak out of the love and excitement generated by my little work, which many people are doing with me. It does require being able to experience pain. It does require tears and outrage. It does require positive disintegration. Our whole culture needs positive disintegration. It has to die to itself. So my Christian upbringing is relevant there: Good Friday and Easter, the necessity for death and rebirth. We are going to die as a culture, and it’s better for us to do it consciously, so we don’t inflict it on everyone else.

http://www.ecobuddhism.org/wisdom/interviews/jmacy

'Country Road' - Kosetsu Minami & John Denver

Episode 28, Ha-Yang Kim - 5049 Records

a wonderful & inspiring listen with Ha-Yang Kim (whom I’d never heard of before this TMT review: http://www.tinymixtapes.com/music-review/ha-yang-kim-threadsuns) where they talk about struggle, dedication to the work, and transitional periods in life.

There is a risk involved, but in the present circumstances I believe it is a risk worth running. I do not believe we have managed to revitalize the world we live in, and I do not believe it is worth the trouble of clinging to; but I do propose something to get us out of our marasmus, instead of continuing to complain about it, and about the boredom, inertia, and stupidity of everything.