Y e l l o w F i n c h Y e l l o w F i n c h

Strangers. Ghost. Faith. Milena Shakujo
(https://soundcloud.com/milenashakujofm)
Julianna Barwick

—Look Into Your Own Mind

(Source: cleanseagain)

III. A Lack of Breath

We are able to tap into such materiality with Marxist tools as well. Marx was very aware of the relation between the soil (advances in agriculture) and capital. Indeed, we too should be aware of the relation of the bios to capital, which extends to what Jason W. Moore has called “peak appropriation,” described as “the long history of enclosure and exhaustion of coal seams, oil fields, aquifers, and peasantries across the space and time of historical capitalism. In this light, the chief problem is not ‘peak everything’ but peak appropriation. Capital’s problem today is not depletion in the abstract but the contracting opportunities to appropriate nature cheaply (with less and less labor).” [33] But of course, there is work, and then there is hard work: work that does not correspond to the idealized notions of capitalism of the brain (cognitive capitalism), but cheap, repetitive and physically exhausting labor. It is this connection between labor and the biosphere that we should also be aware of. Labor consists of work and of working “the biosphere where the time-scale may be 1 million years”; [34] processes of photosynthesis, fossil fuels as well as the now-increasing centrality of rare-earth minerals as memories of geological durations but mined as an essential part of advanced technological information culture — all these are part and parcel of the entanglement of materiality of work and the long-term duration of the materiality of the earth. For sure, such perspectives are usually only revealed in the critical breaking down of the normal processes of production that twentieth-century philosophers — from Heidegger to Gilles Deleuze to Bruno Latour — continuously referred to: only once things fail, then you start to see their complexity. In our case, that failure is the depletion of resources, from fossil fuels (oil as the obvious case, as and the discourse of peak oil) to the already mentioned rare earth minerals. To this list let us add clean water, air, and soil. As for their complexity, after things run out, you start to miss them.

Dust and Exhaustion: The Labor of Media Materialism by Jussi Parikka

http://www.ctheory.net/articles.aspx?id=726

It will not be long before the drawings of kindergarten children are banned, replaced with digital calligraphic exercises.

Paul Virilio - Art and Fear, translated by Julie Rose, pg. 55

10 - Capitalist Representation

Memory has become a bad thing. Above all, there is no longer any need of belief, and the capitalist is merely striking a pose when he bemoans the fact that nowadays no one believes in anything any more. Language no longer signifies something that must be believed, it indicates rather what is going to be done, something that the shrewd or the competent are able to decode, to half understand. Moreover, despite the abundance of identity cards, files, and other means of control, capitalism does not even need to write in books to make up for the vanished body markings. Those are only relics, archaisms with a current function. The person has become “private” in reality, insofar as he derives from abstract quantities and becomes concrete in the becoming-concrete of these same quantities. It is these quantities that are marked, no longer the persons themselves: your capital or your labor capacity, the rest is not important, we’ll always find a place for you within the expanded limits of the system, even if an axiom has to be created just for you. There is no longer any need of a collective investment of organs, as they are sufficiently filled with the floating images constantly produced by capitalism. To pursue a remark of Henri Lefebrve’s, these images do not initiate a making public of the private so much as a privatization of the public: the whole world unfolds right at home, without one’s having to leave the TV screen. This gives private persons a very special role in the system: a role of application, and no longer of implication, in a code. The hour of Oedipus draws nigh.

Chapter 3, Section 10. Anti-Oedipus: Capitalism & Schizophrenia by Felix Guattari & Gilles Deleuze, pg. 250 - 251.

Or else we make a scarecrow of the day,
Loose ends and jumble of our common world

—W.H. Auden

"The everyday was the vague constellation of spaces and times outside what was organized and institutionalized around work, conformity, and consumerism. It was all the daily habits that were beneath notice, where one remained anonymous. Because it evaded capture and could not be made useful, it was seen by some to have a core of revolutionary potential. For Maurice Blanchot, its dangerous essence was that it was without event, and was both unconcealed and unperceived. In French, the adjective ‘quotidienne’ evokes more strikingly the ancient practice of marking and numbering the passing of the solar day, and it emphasizes the diurnal rhythms that were long a foundation of social existence. But what [other philosophers] also described in the 1950s was the intensifying occupation of everyday life by consumption, organized leisure, and spectacle. In this framework, the rebellions of the late 1960s were, at least in Europe and North America, waged in part around the idea of reclaiming the terrain of everyday life from institutionalization and specialization."

from a review of 24/7: Late Capitalism and the End Of Sleep by Jonathan Crary http://chicagoexpat.blogspot.com/2013/06/a-zone-of-insensibility-jonathan-crarys.html

my country
it seems
is always at
war.
whether it’s stomping the shit
out of helpless 3rd world
nations
or brutalizing its own citizens
here at home
it’s clear this country
is out of control.
a vicious gang
of rich thugs
have constructed
a mechanized military monster,
killed off the buffalo,
paved the continent
from end to end
and declared war.
the war on terror
the war on drugs
the war on crime
the war of the rich against the poor
war war war
the human beast
is loose in the streets
screaming for more.
i am afraid
it will go on and on
war without end
until
unfortunately
everyone is dead.

forever war, from “Stone Hotel: poems from prison" by Raegan Butcher, page 88.

He talks about how his brothers are caring and opinionated, and imagines a world where disabilities were more understood. “By and large, the social order is still at the level of an elementary school playground, and the bullying pushes them out of the social fabric and creates an intense frustration—which actually could be a largely avoidable symptom of their condition, and not the condition itself,” he thinks out loud. “Who knows what they would be like if they weren’t brutalized by society? It’s hard to see how much of our social fabric is made up of a radical refusal to love people.” 
http://pitchfork.com/features/cover-story/9439-how-to-dress-well-soul-to-keep/

He talks about how his brothers are caring and opinionated, and imagines a world where disabilities were more understood. “By and large, the social order is still at the level of an elementary school playground, and the bullying pushes them out of the social fabric and creates an intense frustration—which actually could be a largely avoidable symptom of their condition, and not the condition itself,” he thinks out loud. “Who knows what they would be like if they weren’t brutalized by society? It’s hard to see how much of our social fabric is made up of a radical refusal to love people.”

http://pitchfork.com/features/cover-story/9439-how-to-dress-well-soul-to-keep/